VICTORIA PARK MEMORIALS

Vietnam Memorial

Victoria Park, Darling Street

Organised by Dubbo City Council

 

Many of those who served in Vietnam returned to a country torn apart by its involvement in foreign conflicts, a feeling that extended to whose who served. Despite this, Vietnam veterans now form the largest and most active segment of returned servicemen that commerorate Australia's involvement. in wars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II Memorial

Victoria Park, Darling Street

Organised by Dubbo City Council

 

The Rose Garden was planted as a memorial to the men and women of Dubbo who paid the supreme sacrafice during World War II. Tended by Dubbo City Council gardeners the annual blloms are a beautiful reminder of the valour of those who served.

 

Queen Elizabeth II Obelisk

Victoria Park, Darling Street

1954

Organised by Dubbo City Council

 

The visit of reigning monarch was a rare affair for Australia, and even rarer was for that monarch to visit towns such as Dubbo. So it was that the visit by a young Queen Elizabeth ii in 1954 energised the town. The Queen arrived by plane at 3.30 pm on the afternoon of 5 February 1954. After the usual formalities such as a welcome by the Mayor and the national anthem, the Queen and the Duke of Edinburugh went to the showgrounds to view displays of shearing and woodchopping. By 5pm that same day they were back on the plane. Their visit, however brief, was important enough for the community to construct this handsome sandstone memorial.

 

 

ANZAC Memorial Walk

Victoria Park, Darling Street

2015

Organised by Dubbo City Council

 

This is the latest edition to the commerative section of Victoria Park. Made as part of the commemoration of the Centenary of Anzac Day, it features 10 sandstone plinths with brass plaques. Each plaque tells the story of Dubbo's experience of World War 1, from the army training camp at the present day showground, to the fear of German citizens in their midst, to the joy of the armistice being declared. Each story is supplemented by digital material that can be accessed from your smart phone or other digital device.

 

 

Bust of Pilot Officer Rawdon Hume Middleton, VC

Victoria Park, Darling Street

2014

Brett Garling

 

 

On 28 November 1942, Middleton was captain of Stirling bomber, detailed to bomb the Fiat aircraft works at Turin. It was his twenty-ninth combat sortie, one short of the thirty required for completion of a 'tour' and mandatory rotation off combat operations.

 

Middleton and his crew arrived above Turin after a difficult flight over the Alps, due to the low combat ceiling of the "bombed-up" and "fueled-up" Stirling. Over the target area Middleton had to make three low-level passes in order to positively identify the target; on the third, the aircraft was hit by heavy anti-aircraft fire which wounded both pilots and the wireless operator. Middleton suffered numerous grievous wounds, including shrapnel wounds to the arms, legs and body, having his right eye torn from its socket and his jaw shattered.

 

He passed out briefly, and his second pilot, Flight Sergeant L.A. Hyder, who was also seriously wounded, managed to regain control of the plunging plane at 800 feet and drop the bombs, before receiving first aid from the other crew. Middleton regained consciousness in time to help recover control of his stricken bomber.  In great pain and barely able to see, he was losing blood from wounds all over his body, and could breathe only with difficulty, but he determined to get his plane back to England. During the return flight he frequently said over the intercom "I'll make the English Coast. I'll get you home". After four hours of agony and having been further damaged by flak over France, Middleton reached the coast of England with five minutes of fuel left. At this point he turned the aircraft parallel to the coast and ordered his crew to bail out. Five of his crew did so and landed safely, but his front gunner and flight engineer remained with him to try to talk him into a forced landing on the coast, something he must have known would have risked extensive civilian casualties. He steered the aircraft out over the sea, off Dymchurch, and ordered the last two crew to bail out. They then too bailed out, but did not survive the night in the English Channel. Middleton stayed with the aircraft, which crashed into the Channel. His body was washed ashore on 1 February 1943.

 

The last line of his Victoria Cross Citation reads: "His devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds is unsurpassed in the annals of the Royal Air Force".

Cenotaph

Victoria Park, Darling Street

1925 

 

The Cenotaph is the largest structure in Victoria Park and is the centre piece of the city's commeroration of those who have fallen in battle. Annual commemorations such as ANZAC Day and Armisitce Day heavily feature the cenotaph. The brass mouldings are of particular importance, designed by Raymann Hoff. They are excellent examples of classical art-deco from an artist who also designed the ANZAC War Memorial in Hyde Park Sydney. 

 

Sandstone Gates

Victoria Park, Darling Street

1935

 

Though they have the ability to be overlooked, these gates are an interesting addition and introduction to the memorial heart of the city. The ammunition motif speaks to a different age. 

 

The objects on this website have been approved by the Dubbo Public Art Committee as part of the Dubbo Public Art Strategy. If you believe any information to be incorrect please contact the web administrator here.